English 11 Book Club


Throughout your reading of your book, you are expected to (and will be assessed on how well you):


  1. read thoroughly and thoughtfully, and keep a record of your thoughts through annotations

  1. prepare to lead and engage in thoughtful and meaningful discussion of your text with your group on meeting days (remember, we talked about what this should look/ sound like last time!)

  1. write a comparative essay comparing and contrasting the social injustice seen in The Crucible and your independent reading book.


Here is the key question: How does injustice affect a community?



For each section of assigned reading, please complete the following tasks:

1. Identify 3 quotations that show a COMPARISON or a CONTRAST to the Crucible.

2. Closely analyze (explain) your chosen quotations and make connections between the two texts. In your insightful interpretation, be sure to use the “re-quoting” strategy!

3. Identify a “scene” (a 1-2 page passage) to read aloud and discuss with your group. Consider why this scene is significant before your group meeting. Choose something that will give your group members a taste of your book and prompt some discussion.




For each quarter of your book (approximate), you will prepare a plan sheet like this in your notebook:



Book Club Discussion Planning #1

pages ___


Significant Quotations
(Use MLA citation, please!)

Close Analysis
(Use a thorough explanation to show how this quotation shows a comparison or a contrast between your independent reading book and The Crucible)








Choose one significant scene from the section you read.
The scene occurs on pages .

Summarize the scene:

The scene is significant because:


Book Club Discussion Notes


In your discussion, you should:
  • Begin by allowing each person to explain a little about your book so far. Answer the following questions:

  • *How are the characters developing and changing?

  • * What challenges have the characters encountered?

  • * Who seems to be a “victim” and what characterizes them that way?

  • *Who or what is the oppressor?

    • Next, read each person’s significant passages. Discuss each thoroughly. Everyone should participate. Feel free to ask questions, challenge each other’s interpretations, and/or make connections to other books, including The Crucible.

    • Allow each person to share their ideas from their journal entries and significant quotations. Help each other come up with connections! The more you find now, the easier your essay writing will be!

    • Create some working claims based on your reading so far. Consider themes that are being developed in the novel. Everyone’s claims will probably be different—make your claims based on what YOUR book suggests.

  • q As you discuss, record big ideas below.

  • q When you are finished, read silently.


Note the significant ideas you discuss during your discussion today. Pay attention to claims about the significance of your event/person/time period, analysis of the events of the text, evidence from the book that supports your ideas, etc.


How does injustice negatively affect a community??

Claim 1:



Claim 2: